NEWS

Raphael Wallfisch and John York on tour in Scotland and England.

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 28th September 2018

Toi toi to Raphael and John as they hit the road next week for 5 recitals, including 4 in Scotland.

1 October       Perth

2 October      Dundee

3 October      Crieff

5 October      Kelso

6 October     Berkhamstead

The programmes include Schubert Arpeggione, Brahms Sonata in E minor, Macmillan Kiss on Wood, Franck Sonata and Leighton Alleluia Pascha Nostrum

 


Trio Shaham Erez Wallfisch give an outstanding performance to a sold out audience at the ElbPhilharmonie in Hamburg, 23 September 2018

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 25th September 2018


Mysticism and Magic: The Arcadia Quartet release Bartok’s complete string quartets on the Chandos Label

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 18th September 2018

The Arcadia Quartet’s long awaited dream of recording the Bartok quartets has been realised in a recording on the Chandos Label to be released in October.

Although Bartok’s nationality is widely known as Hungarian, his birthplace, Nagyszentmiklós in the Kingdom of Hungary,  has since 1920 been part of Romania and is now called Sannicolau Mare, Romania.  This town is 150km from the Arcadia Quartet’s own Romanian hometown of Cluj.  For the quartet, performing Bartok is about exploring that connection with this region of Transylvania and its folk idioms.

‘Like the Arcadia Quartet itself, the composer’s heritage lies in Transylvania…(it is)..a place where Hungarian, Romanian and German people lived together and influenced each other, within the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and after the First World War, as part of Romania.  Bartok is indisputably a Hungarian composer, but his roots are Transylvania – his music makes it so obvious – and no politics or nationalist paradigm can take that away’

Train Boala (Violist) speaking to Gavin Dixon, The Strad Magazine, September 2018 edition

Ahead of its release, you can listen to excepts of the recording on the following link: https://www.chandos.net/products/catalogue/CHAN%2010992

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Cellist, Raphael Wallfisch and pianist, John York give a highly acclaimed recital in Bucharest

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 12th September 2018

On 5 September, Raphael Wallfisch and John York performed the following programme at the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest as part of the George Enescu International Competition.  Raphael is currently on the Jury of the competition which is in its final week this week.

 

Kenneth Leighton Alleluia Pascha nostrum op. 85 (written for Raphael Wallfisch)

Alexander Zemlinsky Sonata in a minor (1894) lost for a century, rediscovered by Wallfisch, first performed in modern times by Wallfisch & York

Sir James MacMillan Sonata no. 1 (dedicated to Raphael Wallfisch) first performed in 1999 by Wallfisch & York

Guillaume Lekeu Sonata in G (the version for cello and piano, arr. by Ronchini & Wallfisch)

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Arcadia Quartet plays with violinist, Sarah Chang at the Soria Festival in Spain

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 12th September 2018

The Arcadia Quartet played with violinist Sarah Chang to a packed house at the Soria Festival in Spain on 8 September.  The programme that featured Sarah Chang playing Vivaldi Four Seasons and the Arcadia Quartet playing Debussy Quartet in G minor.


The Strad Magazine features the Arcadia Quartet’s forthcoming Bartok release on Chandos Records

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 12th September 2018

The music of Bartok holds a special significance for the members of the Arcadia Quartet. In the September 2018 edition of The Strad magazine Gavin Dixon speaks to violist Traian Boala about recording the composer’s string quartets.


London Handel Players toast the Music and Beyond Festival in Ottawa for a fantastic series of concerts and workshops

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 13th July 2018

A toast from the London Handel Players to Music and Beyond Festival in Ottawa for inviting them to bring their dance project, A Baroque Rebellion!, to the festival in July this year.  Joined by the internationally renowned baroque dancers, Mary Collins and Steven Player, the ensemble performed three concerts of music of English, French and German dances.

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Watch Live-Stream at The Wigmore Hall: Anita Lasker-Wallfisch speaker; Raphael Wallfisch cello; John York piano

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 9th July 2018

Director John Gilhooly felt compelled to invite Anita Lasker-Wallfisch to Wigmore Hall following her recent address to the Bundestag, to mark the 73rd anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. For this event, Anita Lasker-Wallfisch – a survivor of Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen – describes her life story and the importance of learning from one of history’s darkest chapters. She is joined on stage by her son, the acclaimed cellist Raphael Wallfisch and the pianist John York, for music by Bloch, Ravel and Korngold.

Watch it now via their live weblink:

Anita Lasker-Wallfisch speaker; Raphael Wallfisch cello; John York piano

Director John Gilhooly felt compelled to invite Anita Lasker-Wallfisch to Wigmore Hall following her recent address to the Bundestag, to mark the 73rd anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. For this event, Anita Lasker-Wallfisch – a survivor of Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen – describes her life story and the importance of learning from one of history’s darkest chapters. She is joined on stage by her son, the acclaimed cellist Raphael Wallfisch and the pianist John York, for music by Bloch, Ravel and Korngold.

Posted by Wigmore Hall on Sunday, 8 July 2018

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The Times: Dance review: Elizabeth at the Barbican (Raphael Wallfisch, cello)

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 21st May 2018

Former Royal Ballet principal Zenaida Yanowsky is radiant in a show that explores the Virgin Queen’s relationships with the men in her life

★★★★☆
She arrives on stage, dolled up in her regal finery, her red hair fabulously coiffed, every inch of her dressed to rule. Suddenly the layers are stripped away and Elizabeth I is no longer a monarch but a feeble flesh-and-blood woman. The year is 1603, the year of her death. Will Tuckett and Alasdair Middleton’s dance-theatre collaboration then takes us back to the beginning of her reign, in 1558, in a show that explores Elizabeth’s relationships with the men in her life.

The Virgin Queen didn’t have much luck with the opposite sex, but that wasn’t from a lack of trying. Her list of “favourites” included Robert Dudley (Earl of Leicester), Sir Walter Raleigh and Robert Devereux (Earl of Essex), but she was betrayed by them all. Even the Duc d’Anjou, the French toy boy she was supposed to marry, abandoned her by dying prematurely.

Middleton draws on poems, songs and letters of the time (some of them written by Elizabeth) to flesh out the story. Tuckett’s articulate pointe shoe choreography is classically vibrant with a tinge of period flavours, a sheen of regal authority and bursts of acute emotional pain. Martin Yates’s score for solo cello (played wonderfully by Raphael Wallfisch) draws on the music of Elizabethan composers such as John Dowland and Thomas Tallis. A trio of actresses, led by the marvellous Samantha Bond, deliver the words; the baritone Julien Van Mellaerts brings the songs to life with warmth and wit.

Zenaida Yanowsky, the former Royal Ballet principal (this revival is presented by the Royal Ballet), inhabits the many faces of the Tudor queen, from the coquettish but headstrong young woman who loved to sing and dance to the embittered old woman ravaged by time. Yanowsky is radiant throughout the 90 minutes; passionate, tempestuous, melancholic and majestic. A statuesque presence on stage, she looks gorgeous in a succession of beautiful frocks designed by Fay Fullerton.

Yanowsky is well matched by her brother Yury, who brings humour and pathos to the proceedings as the feisty peacock Leicester, the foolish Duc d’Anjou, the rogueish and randy Raleigh and the treacherous Essex.

Debra Craine, The Times, 18 May 2018

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Raphael Wallfisch and NCO, Stoller Hall, review

Posted By: Sinead O'Carroll, 21st May 2018

Neil Sowerby enjoys a fitting end to the Northern Chamber Orchestra’s 50th anniversary season

WHAT a fitting end to the Northern Chamber Orchestra’s 50th anniversary season, consummating their residency in the acoustic heaven that is the new Stoller Hall inside Chetham’s.

NCO president Raphael Wallfisch took centre stage as soloist in Elgar’s Cello Concerto, which has its own anniversary (100) next year. Under-rehearsed for its 1919 premiere, its elegiac intensity lukewarmly received by audiences struggling to resolve their own grief over the Great War, it was Elgar’s last full length work.

I’ve listened to most of the stellar performances that finally established it in the concerto repertoire – Du Pre, Casals, Tortelier – and to occasional florid takes. That would be the last adjective to describe Wallfisch’s taut, passionate interpretation, where the heartbreak of the Adagio feels like a bereft quest for resolution rather than any wallowing. All aided by those Stoller acoustics.

…it is still a shock to see veteran artistic director Nicholas Ward arranging affairs from his leader’s chair
There was a wonderful stripped down clarity, too, to the post-interval Beethoven’s Fifth. What a fiercely compressed piece this remains, those opening four hammer blow notes reassembling themselves across the symphony with fragmentary horn-led echoes even in the lyrically tender slow movement. More than usual you note, too, how the scherzo echoes Mozart (whose jaunty Magic Flute overture opened the afternoon).

Thirty years since the NCO became one of the first ensembles to dispense with a conductor, it is still a shock to see veteran artistic director Nicholas Ward arranging affairs from his leader’s chair. Now the Stoller seems the perfect home for such an approach.

After their usual involvement in the Buxton Festival the NCO will resume their Stoller Hall residency on Friday, September 28 with more Beethoven – the Eroica and Piano Concerto No.3, Freddy Kempf the soloist.

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